Portrait of Clark Terry (Podcast #17-003)

“The first time I ever heard about Clark Terry was when Charlie Barnet told me about him. Charlie was raving: ‘Clark Terry is the greatest trumpet player in the world. You wait and see. Or better still, go get him for your band, but hurry, because soon everybody is going to be trying to get him.’ I consider myself lucky indeed to get him in 1951.

Like Shorty Baker, Clark is from St. Louis, a city that seems to specialize in producing fine trumpet players. Although I don’t think he has had the recognition he deserves, there is one area I know where he is very much appreciated. He is a busy man, but he always finds the time to help the college bands around the country, and I am sure many a youngster has been inspired by him both as a man and as a musician.

When a trumpet player imitates Louis Armstrong, Louis gets the credit. When a trumpet player decides that his style is to be built on Dizzy Gillespie’s, Dizzy gets the credit. The same thing with those saxophone players who copied Coleman Hawkins and Charlie Parker. But today, although I hear a whole new world of flugelhorn stylists formed behind Clark Terry, I hear non of the prime authorities on the subject say, ‘Clark Terry did this sixteen years ago.’ If this is not recognized soon, he could grow up to be the Barzillai Lew of the flugelhorn.” – Duke Ellington, Music Is My Mistress 

Clark_Terrycirca_mid-50s

Betty Grable, Harry James, Clark Terry, Duke Ellington (mid – 1950s)



Clark: The Autobiography of Clark Terry (University of California Press)

Clark



Keep On Keepin’ On, a documentary of Clark Terry’s mentor relationship with young blind piano prodigy Justin Kauflin:

keep-on-keepin-on



I was fortunate enough to have seen Clark Terry in concert a few times. Below are autographs I obtained at a couple of the gigs:

CT Autograph2

CT Autograph1



 

Clark Terry with Count Basie



 

Transcriptions of Clark Terry’s solo on Boo-Dah (from “…And his mother called him Bill) by Kevin Sun



Transcription of Clark Terry’s solo on Blues for Smedley by Jeff Helgesen



The Duke Ellington trumpet section featured on El Gato



Clark Terry’s inimical Mumbles routine!



Clark Terry tells the story on how he joined the Ellington band:



A master educator, here’s Clark Terry dispensing some of his lifetime of wisdom:



The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



duke with a difference

Take the “A” Train (CD: “Duke With A Difference” Original Jazz Classics 229)

Recorded 6 September 1957, New York City

Clark Terry – trumpet; Britt Woodman – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves – reeds; Tyree Glenn – vibes; Jimmy Woode – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.


 

drum is a woman
Hey Buddy Bolden (CD: “A Drum Is A Woman” Sony Music Distribution COL4713202)

Recorded 25 September 1956, New York City

Willie Cook, Cat Anderson, Ray Nance – trumpet; Clark Terry – trumpet, flugelhorn; Britt Woodman, Quentin Jackson, John Sanders – trombones; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Rick Henderson, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano and narration; Jimmy Woode – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums; Joya Sherrill, Margaret Tynes, Choir – vocals.


 

such sweet thunderUp and Down, Up and Down (I will lead them Up and Down) (LP/CD “Such Sweet Thunder” Columbia CL 1033/Columbia/Legacy 65568)

Recorded 24 April 1957, New York City

Willie Cook, Cat Anderson(t); Clark Terry(t,fl); Ray Nance – violin; Britt Woodman, Quentin Jackson, John Sanders – trombones; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Jimmy Woode – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.


 

capitol mosaic

Stardust (CD “The Complete Capitol Recordings of Duke Ellington” Mosaic Records MQ8-160)

Recorded 7 April  1953, Hollywood, California

Willie Cook, Cat Anderson, Clark Terry, Ray Nance – trumpet; Britt Woodman, Quentin Jackson,Juan Tizol – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Rick Henderson, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Wendell Marshall – bass; Butch Ballard – drums.



festival session

Idiom ’59, Part IV, Perdido (CD: “Festival Session” Sony Music Distribution COL4684022)
Recorded 8 September 1959, New York City

Cat Anderson, Harold Baker, Andres Marenguito, Willie Cook, Ray Nance – trumpets, Clark Terry – trumpet, flugelhorn; Britt Woodman, John Sanders, Quentin Jackson -trombones; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington(p); Jimmy Woode – bass; Jimmy Johnson,Sam Woodyard – drums


 

newport 1958Juniflip (CD: “Live at Newport 1958” Sony Music Distribution 53584)
Recorded 21 July 1958, New York City

Cat Anderson, Harold Baker, Ray Nance – trumpets; Clark Terry – flugelhorn; Britt Woodman, Quentin Jackson, John Sanders – trombones; Jimmy Hamilton,  Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Bill Graham, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Jimmy Woode – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.



quincy jones



Boogie Stop Shuffle
 (CD: “Big Band Bossa Nova, The Newest Latin American Rhythm” Polygram Records/Verve 5075252)

Recorded 1962, New York City

Quincy Jones – arranger, conductor; Clark Terry – trumpet; Alan Raph -trombone; Julius Watkins- french horn; Phil Woods, Paul Gonsalves, Jerome Richardson – reeds; Lalo Schifrin – piano; Jim Hall – guitar; Chris White – bass; Rudy Collins – drums; Jack Del Rio, Carlos Gomez, Jose Paula – percussion.


 

terry brookmeyer
Mood Indigo
(CD: “Clark Terry – Bob Brookmeyer Quintet: Complete Studio Recordings” Lone Hill Jazz LHJ 10199)
Recorded 1966, New York City

Clark Terry – trumpet, flugelhorn; Bob Brookmeyer – valve trombone; Hank Jones – piano; Bob Cranshaw – bass; Dave Bailey – drums.


 

mother called him bill

Boo Dah (CD: “…And his Mother called him Bill” RCA 6287)

Recorded 28 August 1967, New York City

Cootie Williams, Cat Anderson, Herbie Jones, Mercer Ellington – trumpets; Clark Terry – flugelhorn; Lawrence Brown, Buster Cooper – trombones; Chuck Connors – bass trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Aaron Bell – bass; Steve Little – drums.


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2 Responses to Portrait of Clark Terry (Podcast #17-003)

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